What is Number of sixes scored?

The number of sixes scored is a cricket term and refers to the number times in a game an individual, team or combined total of times the ball has been hit over the boundary ropes without hitting the ground first.

A six is the maximum number of runs that can be scored from one delivery in a game of cricket. It is rarity in Test match cricket but more common in the shorter formats of the game and adds significant runs to the total score.

Hitting a six is a difficult thing to achieve as it requires the batter to gain as much power as possible which in turn can leave their wicket exposed hence why in Test cricket the shot is rarely attempted despite the numerous rewards of runs.

To learn more about cricket and how to successfully bet it, read up on the game with our betting cricket strategy guide.

How is Number of sixes scored used in Sports Betting?

Markets exist in sports betting for the number of sixes score on multiple bookmakers featured on our site. However, these tend to be only in the shortest format of the game, Twenty20.

This format is where each side only faces 20 overs meaning scoring runs quickly is important and sixes are the quickest way of achieving this.

An example of number of sixes scored would be to place an Over/Under bet of a predetermined number of sixes set by the bookmaker in a game between England and Australia in a limited overs match.

Understanding whether to bet over or under depends on a number of factors such as condition of the wicket, and the batting line-ups of each side.

Did you know…

West Indian heavy hitter Chris Gayle holds the record for the highest number of sixes in a T20 innings.

The self-proclaimed ‘Universe Boss’ hit 18 sixes from 69 balls whilst playing for Rangur Rangers against Dhaka Dynamites in the final of the 2017 Bangladesh Premier League final.

See also

Top Team Batsman

Pair (Cricket)

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